Blood in the Earth

Notes


Matches 101 to 123 of 123

      «Prev 1 2 3

   Notes   Linked to 
101 Known as "Olde Robert Selfe," he was a wealthy man who paid the passage for six unrelated people from England to Virginia. "Tentative Self Outline," by Virginia Easley Demarce, offers proof that he was the father of Robert Selfe, the
acknowledged progenitor of the Selfe Family in the United States. 106
 
Olde Robert Selfe
 
102 I have her parents as John Shatswell born 1574 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England. He died on Feb. 11, 1646 in Ipswich, MA. He married Judith (last name not known) on 1599.

Judith was born 1578 and died on Apr. 17, 1648 in Ipswich, Essex, MA. 
Mary Shatswell
 
103 John married Martha "Patsy" Baker on 19 Apr 1834 in Knox County, KY. John Smith
 
104 Known as Cecil Smith, he suffered from a stroke for the last three years of his life.
His wife was Effie Long. She died in 1956 and had suffered from cancer for a couple of years before succumbing.
Cecil, not one for being alone, married another woman named Effie within weeks of his wife's death.
The second Effie enticed Cecil away from his family. I was a child when I last saw Grandpa Cecil. 
Johnny Cecil Smith
 
105 Mary Snow, the wife of Thomas Paine. Was a daughter of "Nicholas and Constance Snow. Nicholas came over in the Ann, in 1623, and married Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, of the Mayflower band of Pilgrims. Nicholas Snow was a prominent man in the Colony. With six others, it appears, he began the settlement of East- ham in 1645. His death occurred in 1676. Mary Paine was a woman of whom much has been said in her praise. She was a -'faithful wife." ?' a careful mother," a good and -'quiet neighbor," a ?? diligent reader ot God's Holy Word," and a lover of and an attendant at " God's house of worship." Dea. John Paine, her son, thus speaks of her last hours and death in his diary : " On the 2Sth day of April, 1704, my honored mother, "Mary Paine, departed this life, being suddenly taken and struck with death, she having been in reasonable health all day, was taken ill about sunset so she never after spoke reasonable ; but decaying gradualyv gave up the Ghost about the dawn- ing of the day." Neither the date of her birth or marriage appears. No stone, with inscription, marks her resting place. Mary Snow
 
106 Born about 1631 in Kirkham Parish, Lancashire, England to Robert and Mary Townsend Stith, John Stith Sr. immigrated to Virginia before 1656, settling in Charles Cittie Shire (sic), one of the original boroughs created by The Virginia Company under rule of the reigning monarch, King James I of England.

Educated in England as an attorney at law, John's passage was paid by Samuel Earle of London, the owner of a large tobacco plantation along the James River. Stith repaid his passage quickly from his earnings at his practice of Law in the Virginia Colonies and as a County Magistrate of Charles City. He came to this new land holding grants awarded him by King Charles II himself, for his loyalty to the new reigning monarch. He later acquired additional patents containing the following, February 15, 1663/64, Patent for 500 acres on the north side of the James River, property 2: July 29, 1664, 550 acres, property 3: May 11, 1675, 636 acres.

In 1656 He married Jane (Mosby), thought to be the daughter of Vice Edward Mosby; she being born about 1624, and died 1686 in Westover Parish, Charles City County, Virginia. One of the First Families of the original Virginia Colonies, John and Jane became the progenitors of the Stith lineage in America, having at least the following children: their first child, Captain John Drury Stith (called Jr., although his father's name did not include "Drury"), heir to his father's fortune, married Mary Randolph, daughter of Colonel William and Mary Royal Isham Randolph of Turkey Island; a son, Lieutenant-Colonel Drury Stith, married Susanna Barthurst; a daughter Ann, wife of Colonel Robert Bolling Sr. of Kippax Plantation, Hopewell, Virginia; a daughter Jane, wife of Captain Daniel Luellin and daughter Agnes, wife of Thomas Wynn of Prince George County. It is said John had an infant daughter at the time of his marriage to Jane. In 1686 a patent, endorsed by John and Jane, given to Thomas Hardaway, probably the husband of that daughter, as Stith Hardaway descended in this family line.

A gentleman of considerable wealth, a successful merchant, rich tobacco plantation owner, a prominent member of the "colonial aristocracy", John's position in the Colonial Militia was elevated to the rank of Major. And, In the years following, 1685 ? 1686, 1692 ? 1693, John, elected as a Representative to the House of Burgesses became on of its notable and contriversial members.

His death is reported about 1693 in Westover Parish, Charles City County, Colonial Virginia. His Last Will and Testament recorded April 3, 1694.
 
John Stith
 
107 From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.

Killed by a nightmare brought on by sorcer wife, Driva.

A great warrior. He is said once to have taken up his winter abode in
Finland, which together with several archaeological finds, point to an early intercourse between Sweden and Finland. [WBH - Sweden]

Said to have been trampled to death by a nightmare. [A History of the Vikings, p. 37]

A great warrior, he is said once to have taken up his winter abode in Finland.

Father of Visbur who m. Aude the Rich. [History of Sweden, p. 35]

# Reference Number: G6SX-Q1

---

# Note: Vanlandi succeeded his father, Sveigthir, at Uppsala, but was killed by a nightmare that an evel witch conjured up (according to legend). [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev]

# Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
# Note: Page: 3  
Vanlandi Svegdasson
 
108 Odin/Sigge was succeeded in Sweden by his son Njrod, and he in turn by his son Yngve Frey, in whose time there was peace over all the earth. [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev]
# Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
# Note: Page: 2



 
Njord Swedes
 
109 He and his brother killed each other in the royal hall by the high-seat. [WBH - Sweden]

FOSTER, BURR, MINOR, NEWLIN, WAITE LINES

The founder of the Yngling dynasty as accepted by Thiodulf and others was Yngve, who is said to have built the great temple at Upsala, moving thither the capital from the older Sigtuna and contributing to the temple all his lands and riches. Yngve's son was Fiolner. [History of Sweden, p. 35]

!The most important among the chieftains of Sweden was the king of Upsala, who conducted the sacrifices and temple service at Upsala, the oldest and most celebrated place of heathen worship in the Scandinavian North. Originally, he had under his rule only 1/3 of the present province of Upland, the chief settlement of the Sviar, or Swedes in a limited sense. The Upsala kings belonged to the ancient royal race of Skilfing (or Ynglings) who traced their origin from the gods. The founder of the dynasty as accepted by Thiodulf and others was Yngve, who is said to have built the great temple at Upsala, moving thither the capital from the older Sigtuna and contributing to the temple all his lands and riches. [WBH - Sweden]

!Frey was God of the World and Soveriegn of the Swedes, who established the holy place at Uppsala and made his chief residence there. Another name of Frey was Yngvi, and the name of Yngvi was kept for a long while thereafter in his line as a royal name, and the men of his line were thereafter called Ynglings. [A History of the Vikings, p. 37]

Son of Alrek; joint king with his brother Alf. He and his bro. killed each other in the royal hall by the high-seat. [History of Sweden, p. 36]

# Reference Number: G6SX-FG

---

# Note: Legendary Yngling Dynasty.

# Note: We are told the following regarding Yngve Frey: "After his death he was worshipped as a god. The day Friday is named in his honor. His wife's name was Gard."

We are told that Yngve Frey was buried at Uppsala in the tombe of the kings. A statue of him was erected at the Uppsala temple, along with the statues of Odin and Thor. The Swedish people gathered there three times a year to sacrifice to their gods and to hold their councils or "Things". At these events, the king heard the complaints of his subjects, consulted his wise men, and, together with his people, made important decisions for his kingdom.

# Note: The modern historian has difficulty in separating mist-shrouded legends from truth. Who knows? There may have been a real king named Yngve Frey, who was later worshipped as a god.

# Note: [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev]
# Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
# Note: Page: 2-3



 
Yngvi-Frey Swedes
 
110 Elzetti's full name was Elzetti Rebecca Burnettie Todd Trantham (Long, after marriage). She and James were married 27 Dec 1883 in Carroll County, AR. Elzetti Rebecca Trantham
 
111 Oldest known relative as to date. She was 108 when she died. Elizabeth Turner
 
112 Burned to death by sons in his hall.
Succeeded his father Vanlande; m. the dau. of Aude the Rich, whom he afterward left and took another wife, bringing on himself a curse by so doing. Visbur's sons fell unexpectedly over him, burning him in his house. Domalde, his son, succeeded him. [History of Sweden, p. 35]

# Reference Number: G6SX-VP IG

---

# Note: Visbur, the son of Vanlandi, was murdered by his own sons who burned him one night in his hall (according to legend). [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev]
# Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
# Note: Page: 3



 
Visbur Vanlandasson
 
113 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 50-18, 49-19  
Herbert II de Vermandois
 
114 Sacrificed for better crops by followers
!He and his brothers burnt their father in his house. During a great famine in Svithiod, Domalde was offered to the gods as sacrifice in order to obtain good seasons. [WBH - Sweden]

FOSTER, MINOR, NEWLIN, BURR, WAITE LINES

!Sacrificed for good seasons. [A History of the Vikings, p. 37]

He and his brothers burned their father alive in his house after he left their mother. During a great famine in Svithiod he was offered to the gods in order to obtain good seasons. Domalde's son and grandson, Domar and Dygve, both reigned and died in peace. [History of Sweden, p. 35-36]

# Reference Number: G6SX-Z7 IG

---

# Note: Domaldi succeeded Visbur, but he was sacrificed by the nobles in order to end a famine brought about by his treachery (according to legend). [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev]

# Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
# Note: Page: 3



 
Domaldi Visbursson
 
115 Nancy is buried at the Tarlton Cemetery, Newton County,AR. Nancy Adeline West
 
116 Josiah married Dicey Elizabeth WOODS on 30 Oct 1825 in , Habersham, Ga, Usa. Dicey was born in 1809 in , , Sc, Usa. She died in 1873 in Choestoe Dist, Union Co, GA.

1850 Union Co GA Census shows Disey age 41 SC shows illiterate.

1860 Union Co GA Census shows Dicey age 51 NC.

1870 Union Co GA Census shows Eliza age 60 SC.

 
Dicey Elizabeth Woods
 
117
RICHARD WOOLSEY (THOMAS4 , GEORGE "JORIS"3 , GEORGE SR2 , WILLIAM WOLSEY1 )was born 1697 in NY - Jamaica, Queens, Long Island, and died December 12, 1782 in NY - Marlborough, Ulster. He married SARAH FOWLER January 24, 1717/18 in NY - Jamaica, Queens, Long Island, daughter of WILLIAM FOWLER and MARY THORN. She was born 1698 in NY - Flushing, Queens, Long Island, and died Aft. 1779 in NY - Marlborough, Ulster.

REF: Jeff's Work in Progress
WILL: Probated Dec. 12, 1782, Bedford, New York _ Written ? Apr. 21, 1779

NOTES: This line marries back into the Woolsey family in Greene County, Tenn., Via Zepaniah and Sarah Woolsey Woolsey's children.

The quoted from: "Family of George Wood Woolsey & Sarah Nelson" by Hester Woolsey Brewer 1939." When Richard removed from Bedford to Ulster County, New York, about 1730, he was over thirty years of age, and it is thought he must have married Sarah Fowler while still a resident of Bedford, Westchester County.

In 1754 Richard Woolsey bought eight hundred acres of land from Daniel and Abraham Gomez, on the west side of the Hudson River in the precinct of Highland, Ulster County, and 1770 we notice his transfer of two hundred and eleven acres in Newburgh precinct to Thomas Knowlton. In 1760 Richard converyed other land to his sons, Benjamin and John, which John left to his son Henry.

While residing at Marlborough, in 1774, Richard was road commissioner. At the time of the first settlement of this community, it was the custom of branding cattle, so that each owner might readily distinquish his property, and those of Richard were identified by "a crop ye left ear and two slits in the right ear".

In 1763 Richard was on the list of those subscribing to the Presbyterian Society and Church at Marlborough. In April 1775 he signed the pledge to stand by the orders and resolutions of the Continental and Provincial Congress, sent to all precincts from the convention at New Platz, Ulster County. Before this time he had been appointed Commissioner of Highways."

CORR:
1999 March through August from Wilford W. Whitaker

As I look at Richard Woolsey and Sarah Fowler's children, I find myself wanting to know more about this couple. Several of their sons and grandsons served in the Revolutionary War, and that was when Westchester and some in Ulster county, NY was a hot bed of Loyalist activity, but many more Loyalists in Westchester.

I have often wondered how a family from Rhode Island (Hopkins) could meet a family in Washington County, Virginia (Woolseys) before either came to Virginia, as their children met and married somewhere before coming to Virginia.

Then I find the following interesting bit of information: Meeting at Newburgh (which included Marlborough), at Nehemiah Denton's first Tuesday in April 1770: Richard Woolsey, Commissioner of Roads (with others) (wife Sarah Fowler) John Woolsey, Path master from Dubois's line to Halleck's mill Brook (wife Chlorene Peck, son of Richard Woolsey and Sarah Fowler. FRANCIS HOPKINS, Path master from the head of ten stone meadow, eastward to Jonathan Hicks's house.

So here we have Francis Hopkins in Marlborough, Ulster county, New York in 1770. This makes me think that George Woolsey and Mary Hopkins were married in Marlborough (or New Marlborough as it was known then), Ulster, New York.

Thomas Woolsey is Richard Woolsey and Sarah Fowler's oldest son (and is so designated in Richard's Will). I have found Thomas Woolsey in Ulster County, NY

CORR:
Nancy Thoben:
Cyprian Meech Woolsey, who wrote that fine "History of Marlborough", stated that his great-grandparents Richard Woolsey and Sarah Fowler had 12 children, 4 girls and 8 boys. I have 13 children listed for them, but he is probably the more correct.

PROBATE: In the Name of God, amen. [21 Apr 1779] I Richard Wolsey of Bedford in Westminister County and State of New York, being Weakly in Body But of perfect Mind and Memory Thanks be given unto God, calling to mind the Mortality of my body and Knowing that it is appointed to all Men once to Die, Do make and ordain this My Last Will and Testament That is to Say Principally and first of all I give and Recommend My Soul into the Hand of Almighty God that gave it and My Body I Recommend to the Earth to be buried in Decent Christian Manner at the Discretion of My Executors Nothing Doubting but at the general Resurection I Shall Receive the Same again by the Mighty Power of God, and as touching Such Worldly Estate Wherewith it has Pleased God to Bless me in this Life I give demise and Dispose of the same in the following Manner and Form:

First I make Daniel Wolsey of New Palze and Jacob Griffin of Fish Kills the Sole Executors of this My Last Will and Testament.

I give to Sarah My well beloved Wife all My Estate During her life and after her Decease to be Divided in the following Manner:

First I give to my Eldest Son Thomas ten pounds New York Money the Rest of my Estate I give to my three Daughters that is Ruth, Sarah and Hannah to be divided Equally Between the three, and I do hereby Utterly disallow Revoke and Disanul all and every other former Testament Wills Legacies Bequests and Executons, by me in any ways Before Named Willed and Bequeathed Ratifying and Confirming this and no other to be My Last Will and Testament in Witness whereof I have hereunto Set My Hand and Seal this twenty first Day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Nine.

Signed Sealed Published Pronounced and Declared by
the Said Richard Woley as his Last Will and Testament in the Presence of us Who in his Presence and in the Presence of Each other have here to subscribed our names.
Justes Harris
James Clark

Richard Wooley

Bettey Clark
Dutchess County, New York Probates Records. p. 413. [12 Dec 1782] Dutchess County FS Be it remembered that on the twelfth day of Decemb. one thousand Seven hundred and eighty two personally came and appeared before me Thomas Tredwell Judge of the Court of Probates of the State of New York James Clark of Bedford in the County of Westchester yeoman and being duly sworn on his oath declared that he did see Richard Wolley Sign and seal the within written Instrument purporting to be the Will of the said Richard Wooley bearing date the twenty first day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy nine and heard him publish and
declare the same as and for his last Will and testament. That at the time thereof he the said Richard Wooley was of Sound disposing mind and memory to the best of the knowledge and belief of him the deponent and that his name subscribed to the said will is of his own proper hand writing when he subscribed as a Witness to the said Will in the presence of the Testator and that he the deponent saw Gustes Harris and Betty Clark the other witnesses to the said Will subscribe their names as Witnesses thereto in the Testators presence.

Thomas Tredwell Judge of Probates

Dutchess County FS Be it also Remembered that on the same day Jacob Griffin one of the Executors of the within written will of Richard Wooley likewise appeared before me the said Thomas Tredwell and was duly sworn to the true execution and performance of the said will by taking the oath of Executor as by law appointed before me.

Thomas Tredwell Judge of Probates


2002 June 23 from Wilford Whitaker
Richard Woolsey and Sarah Fowler, of Westchester and Ulster Cos., NY. They must have been an outstanding couple. Most of their 6, 7, or 8, sons were in the Revolutionary War, and Richard himself, signed the Articles of Association, though at an advanced age, giving him Revolutionary War service.

Much of the material I have used on these families can be obtained from the Family History Branch Library of the Church of JESUS CHRIST of Latter Day Saints.

HIST: The New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD. Vol. 132. Number 3. July 2001. p. 171ff. "Customers and Others in the Ledger of Caleb Fowler of New Castle 1754-1760". A transcript of all names which appear in the store and tavern ledger of Caleb Fowler (c. 1708-c.1776-78). He seems to have taken over a tavern run by his father, William, and his brother, Moses. Its exact location has not yet been identified, but it was in the old town of North Castle somewhere near the Philipsburgh line and the Bronx River.

Caleb Fowler was a "resident of the West Patent of north Castle [i.e. present New Castle] where he owned a great deal of property" [J. Thomas Scharf, HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY, New York, 1886 1:527) . . . " A microfilm copy was obtained by the NYG&B Society Library.
p. 173. Green, John 47. sub[sidiary] Thomas Wright 6, Benjamin Brown, Richard Woolsie, Sr. 165.
Green, John, Jr. 47; sub[sidiary] Gilburt Wright 99; John Woolsey 152; Moses Fountain, Sr. 175.
p. 176. Woolsey/Woolsie, John, John, sub John Green 47 and sub Daniel Totten 20.
Woolsie, Benjamin 110
Woolsey, Jr. "son of Richard 14
Woolsie, John "son of William" 152 [ " for your brother Jonathan Woolsey" ]
Woolsie, Jonathan, Sr. 144.
Woolsie, Richard, Sr. 165.
Woolsie, Richard "carpenter son of William" 61.

HIST: Cochrane, Charles H. THE HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK. ILLUSTRATED. POUGHKEEPSIE 1887. p. 171
The Woolsey Family. William and John Woolsey were brought up in Dutchess County, but came to Marlborough some time prior to 1763. John Woolsey's name appears among the contributors to the fund raised in 1763 to build the Presbyterian Church in Marlborough. William Woolsey was an ensign in the Continental army. He left a son, Richard I., who md Chlorine Woolsey, his cousin. Their children were: David Woolsey, Thomas Woolsey and John Woolsey, who all lived and died in this town. David md Lucy T. Meech, of Westfield, Mass. Their children were: George, William , Richard, C. Meech, Mary, Ellen. William and Richard lived in Milton, but are now dead. Mary md John Atkins and went to Cornwall where she died. Ellen is the wife of Ira Wood and lives in Cornwall. C. Meech is a lawyer, living in Milton. He has been honored with many public positions, from justice of the peace to the state legislature. At present he represents the town in the Board of Supervisors. [Richard Woolsey, of Marlborough, ancestor of Peter V. L. Purdy, John Ed. Woolsey, Mrs. John Lawson and others, is thought to have been a brother or cousin of William and John Woolsey.] William Woolsey (2) md a cousin Chlorine Woolsey, and settled in Jersey City, and had children: David, Thomas, John and Electa.

GENE: Wilford W. Whitaker, Murray,UT descends through Thomas & Sarah Pierce
GENE: James W. Woolsey, Richland, WA descends through Josiah & Mary Owen.
GENE: Donald C. Hart, Santa Cruz, CA descends through Henry & Abigail --.
GENE: Grace Woolsey Nelson, Onamia, MN descends through Jos. & Mary Haight.
GENE: James C. McKnight,Ft Collins,CO descends through Thomas & Sarah Pierce
GENE: C. M. Woolsey, Bedford, NY descends through Rev. Benjamin & Abigail.
GENE: Marjorie Young, descends through John & Abigail Whitehead
GENE: Hart, Donald C. "A Woolsey Family of America 1623-1975". 929.273 W887a. Santa Cruz, CA.
GENE: Woolsey, Robert M. Merrimack, NH

HIST: Woolsey, Cyprian Meech. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER, NEW YORK, from its earliest discovery. Albany. J. B. Lyon Co., 1908. 471 p. facsims. maps, ports. photocopy of original, 1992. includes index. p. 355. 30 Dec 1765.
This day was chosen a committee for Marlbough Society (of Presbyterians) & a Moderator. Thomas Knowlton, Moderator; Capt. Richard Woolsey, Lieut. Lewis Du Bois, Eliphalet Platt & Daniel Thurston, Committee.

ON-LINE: 1763 List of the Freeholders in Westchester County, New York
William Woolsey, yeoman. Bedford.
Richar Woolsey, yeoman. Bedford.
William Woolsey, yeoman. Pound Ridge.

ON-LINE: 1770 TAX ROLLS - Town of Amenia, Dutchess County, New York.
Woolsey, Denton
Woolsie, Richard

ON-LINE: 1772 TAX ROLLS - Town of Amenia, Dutchess County, New York.
Woolsey, Richard

HIST: Woolsey, Cyprian Meech. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER, NEW YORK, from its earliest discovery. Albany. J. B. Lyon Co., 1908. 471 p. facsims. maps, ports. photocopy of original, 1992. includes index. p. 201. Cattle Marks - At the time of the first settlemnt of this community, it was the custom to brand cattle that each owner might readily distinguish his property from that of his neighbors. Following is a description of some of the various brands, from 1750 to 1790, approximately:
Richard Woolsey - A crop in ye Left & with Slits and a Slit in the right Ear
Richard Woolsey - A Crop of the Left Ear a Slit in the Crop a half penny the under Side of the Same Ear a Slit in the Right Ear a half penny the back Side of the Same.

HIST: Woolsey, Cyprian Meech. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER, NEW YORK, from its earliest discovery. Albany. J. B. Lyon Co., 1908. 471 p. facsims. maps, ports. photocopy of original, 1992. includes index. p. 305. "The Marlborough Presbyterian churchyard is almost as old as the first two spoken of; the first interment there was in Mar, 1764 - a child of James Merritt; and the following are some of the oldest graves I find there: Richard Woolsey, born 1697, died 1777, [wrote his will 1779] aged 80 years. Sarah Fowler, wife of Richard Woolsey, died 1770. [Will probated 12 Dec 1782, see below]

HIST: The New York Genealogical and Biographical RECORD. Vol. 132. Number 3.
July 2001. p. 171ff. "Customers and Others in the Ledger of Caleb Fowler of New Castle 1754-1760". A transcript of all names which appear in the store and tavern ledger of Caleb Fowler (c. 1708-c.1776-78). He seems to have taken over a tavern run by his father, William, and his brother, Moses. Its exact location has not yet been identified, but it was in the old town of North Castle somewhere near the Philipsburgh line and the Bronx River.

Caleb Fowler was a "resident of the West Patent of north Castle [i.e. present New Castle] where he owned a great deal of property" [J. Thomas Scharf, HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY, New York, 1886 1:527) . . . " A microfilm copy was
obtained by the NYG&B Society Library.
p. 173. Green, John 47. sub[sidiary] Thomas Wright 6, Benjamin Brown, Richard Woolsie, Sr. 165.
Green, John, Jr. 47; sub[sidiary] Gilburt Wright 99; John Woolsey 152; Moses
Fountain, Sr. 175.
p. 176. Woolsey/Woolsie, John, John, sub John Green 47 and sub Daniel Totten 20.
Woolsie, Benjamin 110
Woolsey, Jr. "son of Richard 14
Woolsie, John "son of William" 152 [ " for your brother Jonathan Woolsey" ]
Woolsie, Jonathan, Sr. 144.
Woolsie, Richard, Sr. 165.
Woolsie, Richard "carpenter son of William" 61.

LAND: Ulster County, New York DEEDS. FHL film #944756. 26:414. 2 May 1754
Richard Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester County, New York, yeoman TO Richard Harcourt of Precinct of Highlands in Ulster County, yeoman for 425 pounds - land on W side of Hudsons River in Precinct of Highlands in Ulster County - Begin at a pitch pine sapling marked on 4 sides with stones round it thence N 73 degree W 79 chains to a S &S round it thence S 1 degree 36 chains to a stake with a heap of stones round it thence S 73 degrees E 71 chains & 50 links to Hudsons River to a white pine bush marked on 4 sides with a heap of stones round it thence along the river to the place where it begun. 256 acres. Bounded N & W by Richard Woolsey's land and E by Hudsons River.Signed: Richard Woolsey
Witnesses: Thomas Knowlton, Benjamin Woolsey, Thomas Woolsey. 12 Feb 1761
Thomas Knowlton appeared and swore he was a witness to above deed and Richard's Thomas Knowlton appeared and swore he was a witness to above deed and Richard's SIGNATURE. Recorded 25 Feb 1825.

LAND: Ulster County, County Clerk, Kingston, New York.
"In 1770, Richard conveyed to Thomas Knowlton 211 acres of land. I think he was the original Richard." (C.M. Woolsey 1 Sep 1920 to W. Herbert Wood.)

LAND: Ulster County, New York DEEDS FHL film# 944743 GG:339. 28 Apr 1770.
Richard Woolsey of Bedford in County of Westchester and Province of New York, yeoman, of the 1st part and sold to Thomas Knowlton, yeoman of Precinct of Newburgh County of Ulster for 220 pounds - all of land being in precinct of New Burgh begin at Hudson River at a pitch pine sapling - standing in the NE corner of Richard Harcourt's farm marked on 4 sided with stones runs N 73 degrees W 82 chains and 40 links to a chestnut tree N 1 degree W 34 chains & 60 links - S 63 degrees 92 chains and 50 links to Hudson river to beginning. 211 acres.
Witnessed by Richard Woolsey and Joseph Woolsey. signed by Richard Woolsey /seal/

ON-LINE: Descendants of Thomas Knowlton of Bedford, Westchester, New York.
July 2002. - Thomas Knowlton, b 7 Apr 1720, Bedford, Westchester Co, NY, d abt 1800/01, Ontario, Canada. a Farmer. probably had different mother if this is his correct birthdate. 1752 - wit deed in Marlborough, Ulster Co, NY. 1763 - signed subscription pledge for Marlborough Presbyterian church. 1770 conveyed 200 acres in Ulster Co, by Richard Woolsey. - md abt 1746, Bedford, Anna ____?, b 4 Jul 1725. children:
i. Enoch Knowlton, b 1760, d 1827/28, Leeds Co, Ontario, Canada, farmer.
ii. Thomas Knowlton, b 6 Jul 1761, Bethlehem, Albany Co, NY, d. Canada, farmer.

"In 1801, John Woolsey, (son of above Richard), conveyed to Henry Woolsey his son, 203 acres of land in 1801." (C.M. Woolsey 1 Sep 1920 to W.H. Wood)

"In 1811, Moses Woolsey, son of Daniel Woolsey, and Abigail his wife gave a deed. (ibid cm. woolsey to wh wood) 4444"In 1811, Thomas Woolsey & Rebecca his wife gave a deed 117 acres. (ibid)

"In 1823, David Woolsey and Rebecca his wife, deed dated 1822, also gave a deed in 1823." (ibid)

"In 1824, Richard S. Woolsey and Phebe his wife gave a deed." (ibid)

"In 1754, Richard Woolsey of Bedford, Westchester Co. have a deed to Richard Harcourt. 256 acres. This was the first Richard Woolsey. Witnessed by Benjamin
Woolsey and Thomas Woolsey. (ibid)

CEM: Town of Bedford Cemeteries 1681-1975. FHL # 974.7277/B1 N2b Vol. 8 p. 393. "Richard Woolsey [1697 - 1777] Son of Thomas Woolsey." BU 7

LAND: Woolsey, C. M. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK, From its Earliest Discovery. Illus. Albany. J. B. Lyon Company. 1908. Designated as "CMW"
p. 353. Subscriptions for the Presbyterian Church, Marlborough, 8 Aug 1763, includes Thos Woolsey, 2 lbs, John Woolsey, 2 lbs, Benj. Woolsey, 3 lbs, Richard Woolsey, 3 lbs.

LAND: Woolsey, C. M. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK, From its Earliest Discovery. Illus. Albany. J. B. Lyon Company. 1908. Designated as "CMW"
The First Baptisms, Marriages and Deaths. Presbyterian Churchyard, Marlborough, Ulster, New York.
p. 305. Richard Woolsey, born 1697, died 1777, aged 80 years. [wrote his will 1779) aged 80 years. Sarah Fowler, wife of Richard Woolsey, died 1770. (Will probated 12 Dec 1782, (in Sarah's File)[Will probated 12 Dec 1782, see below]

HIST: C. M. Woolsey - writer of "History of Ulster" He says his great grandfather had 8 boys and 4 girls and he can hardly give his own descent, let any one else's. Correspondence of C. M. Woolsey, attorney at Law and Real Estate, Milton, NY, 7 Nov 1923 to W. Herbert Wood. "I am not yet satisfied about when and where Richard Woolsey died, nor Sarah Fowler. I had always supposed that they died here. I am positive that Richard built a log house and afterward added a stone addition to it in this town. And that they raised a part if not all of their twelve children here. I find by ancient records that he was identified with this town for years. He was among the early subscribers to the erection of the Presbyterian Church, and had a patent of land here and held offices. His name appears in many records - in assessment to work on highways, etc. If he died anywhere else he must have gone there in his old age. After his son John, my great grandfather, took the premises that Richard lived with him. There is an ancient field stone marked "R.W." in the Presbyterian graveyard near his son John's grave. There is no WILL of his recorded in Ulster or Westchester counties. Then I wrote to Albany about his and his wife's WILL and there is no record there. In your letter of August to me, you speak of finding his WILL in NY city. Did you find it in
the Surrogates Office? Or where did you find it? I am positive that this Richard Woolsey is the original Richard. Please give me what information you can. Very truly yours, C. M. Woolsey.

Richard & Sarah moved from Jamaica, L.I. to near Bedford, NY, about 1719, just prior to the birth of their first child. Richard's father Thomas followed to Westchester Co, abt 1721. J. W. Woolsey believed that Richard moved to Dutchess Co., NY abt 1721. Here he purchased land and moved onto it. This is where he died, and left a WILL. But many years later his grave was moved to the Old Burying Ground Cemetery at Bedford, NY. That is where it is to be found today - 1982. But the dates on his tomb stone do not agree with some dates in his WILL. A large percent of the American Woolsey Family can trace their Family back to one of the children of this family.

There are some problems with dates here, as the later dates show children being born to Sarah when she was over 50 years old. More research needed! One of the biggest problem start right with his will which states clearly it was written in 1779 and probated in 1782, while the tombstone dates state 1777 was when he died.

HIST:
HISTORY OF THE COUNTY OF WESTCHESTER FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME by Robert Bolton Jr. . New York. Alexander s. Gould. 1848. p. 548-549. Use this article with great care, many mistakes and problems.

GENE: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Vol. 58. 1927. check index for pages.

GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland. "Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12.

LAND: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Jan 1925. Westchester County, New York Miscellaneous Land and Property. p. 322. Gilbert Palmer sold to Jacob Griffin of Fishkill in Dutchess County, executor for Richard Wolsey of Bedford, dec'd, land in Bedford, bounded by land formerly belonging to Josiah Woolsey, dec'd. 16 May 1787.

LAND: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Jan 1925. Westchester County, New York Miscellaneous Land and Property. p. 244. James McDonalds mortgaged land in Beford, bounded by land late the property of Richard Woolsey, dec'd, and of "Mathew" Fountain, late dec'd. 28 May 1789.

CORR:
1998 November 2 from Van Gorden, Mary E. 809 North 8th Street, Black River Falls, WI 54615. Working on a book for family members for the past 25 years.

ON-LINE: Woolsey List. Posted 6 Oct 1999 by Renee' and John Sykes
"My husband's line joins in through George's son Thomas, to Richard, to Daniel, to Sarah Woolsey, to Noah Woolsey Kelsey, to Benjamin Fuller Kelsey, to Lavina Augusta Kelsey, to Clayton Frank Dickinson, to Joanne Carol Dickinson (my husband's mother) also the lines cross at Richard's (1697) son Henry, to Daniel, to Richard (1779), to Sarah Woolsey and she md Noal Woolsey Kelsey down through their son Benjamin. Very confusing, only took me several days to figure it out and four wall charts. It is from George back and some dates before. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Renee' and John."

DAR: Daughters of the American Revolution Graves Index. FHL film# 860330. 3:106. Bedford, Westchester Co., NY. Union Cemetery abt 2 miles W of village a little S of the main road to Bedford Station - opened abt 1850 - older stones moved here with bodies - 1730-1901.
3:106. Woolsey, Josiah 1738 - 17880, s/o Richard Woolsey
Thomas 1772 - 1839, s/o Richard Woolsey (s/b Josiah Woolsey?)
Tamar 1772 - 1867 (s/b 1857?) his wife (wife of Thomas Woolsey)

MONUMENT
Family from Robert Woolsey of Ipswich, England, the father of Cardinal Woolsey through George Woolsey, b 1647 at Flushing, Long Island, New York and from him come Col. Melancthon Taylor Woolsey b 1720 Dosoris, L. I., NY, died in Canadian French War in 1758.

Major General Melancthon Taylor (s/b Lloyd) Woolsey b Dosoris, L. I. in 1758, died in Trenton, NJ. 1819.
Col. Melancthon Taylor Woolsey b Dosoris, L. I. 1780 d Utica, NY 1838. Record of all family are in same plot.

DAR: Personal correspondence and DAR application papers of Carolyn Woolsey Fillers Jennings. May 2002. - Richard Woolsey, resided at New Marlborough, Ulster Co, NY assisted in estab. American Independence, while acting in the capacity of Road Commissioner and signer of ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION FOR CONTINENTAL CONGRESS 29 Apr 1775 in Ulster Co, NY. from NEW MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER CO, NY, IN THE REVOLUTION, edited by Ruth P. Heidgerd 1997, pg 20 - "signers of Articles of Association from New Marlborough".

ON-LINE: Alliance Chapter, NSDAR - Chapter ancestors - Roll of Honor - Woolsey, Richard (Sara) - Pennsylvania - Supposition by Wilford Whitaker - doesn't know of another Richard Woolsey, wife Sarah, of PA.??

DOCUMENTS: [Sent 19 Aug 2002 - by E. W. Knowlton, 361 Arizona Ave., NE, Atlanta, GA 30307.]

PETITION OF INHABITANTS OF NORTH CASTLE, approximate date . . . 1736-1743 . . . . [From Westchester Documents - Edward Raymond Collection - Town Historians' Collection] "
"To the Right Honorable George Clarke Esq Commander in Chief of the Province of New york, &c. - The Petition of the Inhabitants of North Castle and bordering neighbors Hunibly Sheweth, That your poore petitioners are greivously oprest by francies Pellem Esqr Justice of the peach for this county for that the said Justice Is a man that is given to Drinking and for the most part apears a party and Is very Rash In way of Speaking in Liccor that If it Was not for the Law of man he would kill a man before night, and he will have Special warrants and Send for poore men and then perswade them it Will be Charge to them and If they would not give him some money In pocket and treat him with puch which I his usal drink, and ye sd compleaner was forsd so to do and when money has been paid and a Receit given he has given
Judgment again for some of that money by - By these and many other Like actions wee are much oprest therefore wee yoour Honours poore petione's pray you would Suspend him from acting as a Justice any Longer that we may Injoy peace and wee shall Ever pray for your long administration ouer us, and In the main time beg Leive to subscribe our Selves your Honours most obedient Humble Servants.
William Dusinberre Rychard Wooley Reuben Hallam Dauid Febe
Robert Knoulton Jacob Forman Robert Carpenter Joseph Sarls
Joseph Fowler Richard Honeywell Henery Dusinberre [ abt 1750 ]

THE NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD VOLUME XXV., 1894.
Carpenter. ? The following is extracted from MS. records in the office of the Secretary of State at Albany, and may be of interest to the readers of the Record :
On Dec. 4, 1721, the following petition.was sent to (Governor William Burnett : "The humble Petition of Joseph Carpenter and Job Wright Inhabitants within the county of Westchester in behalf of themselves and nine others of the new settlers back in the woods between Rye and Bedford showetli that your petitioners about three years ago having with sixteen others purchased from Capt. Robert Walter and company a tract of land contiguous in the back of Rye and within the limit of said township, have at their own very great cost and expense and labors settled themselves thereon, and by their industry and number, they being upwards than Thirty able men, tho' poor, cultivated and improved the same for the subsistence and livelyhood of themselves and their families ? a thing very hard to perform by new settlers," etc., etc. . . . .

The balance of the petition, a very long document, recites the high rate of their taxes, which they think have been unjustly levied upon them by the authorities of Rye.

We can easily believe they were " poor," for by tradition they " bonded their town " in order to buy a grindstone; but if they had only told us the names of the nine, sixteen, and thirty others we would have liked it. But perhaps the following will give a little information on that point and also show their " Temperance proclivities."

BURIAL:
Richard and Sarah Fowler Woolsey are buried in NY - Marlborough, Ulster - Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Residence: NY - Westchester County
Source of Information: Nancy Curran
HIST: Fowler, Christian Cecilia. "History of the Fowler Family". DAR# 265987 - Fowler motto: "He is wise who Watches." -
INTERNET: Thorn(e) Genealogy. http://thorn.pair.com/williamthorne1/d829.htm
GENE: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Vol. 58. 1927. check index for pages.

GENE: File sent by Ronald L. Gilliland."Descendants of John Wolsey". p.12-13
PROBATE: Collections of the New-York Historical Society for the year 1893. Publication Fund Series. New York. Printed for the Society. 1893. p. 132-3. Abstracts of Wills - Liber 8:[p. 323]. In the name of God, Amen, this 24 Jan 1711. I, William Fowler of Flushing, in Queens County, yeoman, being in perfect health. . . . My son Joseph is to pay to my daughter Sarah, 30 pounds, when she is 18, and to my daughter Hannah, the same. . . . I leave to my daughter, Mary Dusenbury, a negro girl, and to my daughter Rebecca another, and 30 pounds to each. . . . To my daughters Sarah and Hannah, 20 pounds. I leave to my son, Benjamin Fowler, all my lands and meadows in Flushing and he shall pay to his mother 100 pounds, and 25 pounds to each of my daughters Rebecca, Sarah, and Hannah. I make my wife Mary Fowler and Jeremiah Fowler of Eastchester, and William Thorne of Flushing, exeutors. Witnesses, Joseph Hunt, Thyomas Cook, Daniel Clarke. Proved 25 May 1714.

GENE: Purdy, Clayton C GILBERT PURDY OF NEWBURGH, NY 1721-1778 - 30 Meadowbrook Road, Syosset, NY 11791.1981.929.273 P972pc v.5. pt.1. p.3707.
In 1762 the old Precinct of the Highlands was divided into the Precincts of New Windsor and Newburgh - Newburgh embracing the towns of Marlborough and Plattekill in Ulster County, and the present town of Newburgh in Orange County. and Also: 16 Apr 1770, Samuel Fowler, Stephen Wiggins, Leonard Smith and Nathan Purdy petitioned Governor Cadwallader Colden for a "Royal Charter of Incorporation of St. George's Church in thne Parish of Newburgh and County of Ulster". The Charter was granted 2 May 1770. Also: Among the persons who refused to sign a pledge of association drawn up by a Committee of Safety and Observation in 1775. "Those who refused to sign were "deemed enemies of their country" - American Archives, Vol.ume 2, 4th Series, page 471 + "History of Orange County and Newburgh". E. M. Ruttenber 1875, p. 197 et seq.) were: - Nehemiah Fowler md Abigail Purdy, Stephen Wiggins md miss Purdy, Isaiah Purdy, Gilbert Purdy, Nathan Purdy, John Wiggins, John Wiggins, Jr., Abel Flewwelling, Jonathan Pine Samuel Fowler, Jonathan Brundage, Nathan Purdy, Jun., Daniel Purdy, Daniel Purdy Jun., David Horton, Daniel Durland, John Morrell, Daniel Gedney, Joseph Gedney, Daniel Denton md a dau of David Purdy, Daniel Denton, Jun.

HIST: Fowler, Christian Cecilia. "History of the Fowler Family". DAR# 265987 - Fowler motto: "He is wise who Watches." - Sara Fowler, born after 1698/9 md Richard Woolsey and settled at Beford, NY. Sara was the dau of William Fowler and Mary Thorn. She and her brothers and sisters were all (probably) born at Flushing, Long Island, New York.

CORR: From Jon Thew:
Bingo, I have been trying to identify Isaac's connection for years. I have suspected Isaac's grandfather to be Richard Woolsey Jr b.1730 d.1811, but don't know which of his 9 children with Ann Fuller is his father. I know Issac b.1790 was 20 years older than his wife Louisa Hubbard b. 1810. Harriet Woolsey and Wm L Church had 5 children; Ralph, William, Lewis, Kaherine and Bertha Louisa my grandmother who married Martin E. Thew. My mother's connection to the Woolsey's is through Sarah b.1772. Sarah's father was Josiah Woolsey b.1738 one of Richard Woolsey Sr b.1697 sons. So, who is Isaac's father? Jon T. Thew 11810 Tree Fern Court Reston, VA 20191-4238

LAND: Woolsey, C. M. HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARLBOROUGH, ULSTER COUNTY, NEW YORK, From its Earliest Idscovery. Illus. Albany. J. B. Lyon Company. 1908. Designated as "CMW" The First Baptisms, Marriages and Deaths. Presbyterian Churchyard, Marlborough, Ulster, New York. p. 305. Richard Woolsey, born 1697, died 1777, aged 80 years. [Discrepancy here - s/
b 1779?? www] Sarah Fowler, wife of Richard Woolsey, died 1770.

PROBATE: Hoff, Henry B. editor. LONG ISLAND SOURCE RECORDS. from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore. 1987. FHL# 974.721 H29L. 2:181.
Mary Thorne b abt 1669; d not earlier than 1714. Abt 1687 md William Fowler b Providence, R.I; bur 11 May 1714 in Flushing, a son of Henry and Rebecca (Newell) Fowler of Providence.
2:181. The family of William and Mary (Thorne) Fowler appear in the Flushing Census of 1698 as: William ffowler Carp [enter] and Mary his wife 8 (The "8" indicates 8 persons in the family)
William John Joseph Benj Mary Rebeca
Negro Jack 1 (The "1" indicates 1 slave) (DHNY:1:662-3).
2:181. On 29 Nov 1711, "Mary ye wife of Wm Fowler" and daughter Mary were baptized at Flushing by the Rev. Thomas Poyer (Grace Church, Jamaica, p. 269).
2:181. William Fowler was a carpenter and blacksmith in Flushing who invested heavily in land in Harrison's Purchase at Rye, including property recently a part of the Whitelaw Reid estate. before his death William Fowler transferred 720 acres of his Westchester holdings to his sons William, John and Joseph (Rec:58:264-5). In his will, executed 24 Jan 1711 and proved 25 May 1714, he left all lands and meadows in Flushing together with "his shope and tools of the smith's trade" to his son benjamin, when of age, and dived 900 acres of land in Westchester County between his sons Jeremiah, Thomas and Henry, also when they came of age. His four daughters received a total of 80 pounds, plus a Negro girl for the eldest, who was then married. Reference was made in the will to "50 pounds due from Father Thorne," an item which appeared in the will of John Thorne as a bequest to Daughter mary Fowler." His wife, together with Jeremiah Fowler of Eastchester and "William Thorne of Flushing," presumably his brother-in-law William Thorne, were named executors WNYHS:2:132 cf N.Y. Co. Wills:8:323). The children of William and Mary (Thorne) Fowler, the first six in the order of the Flushing Census, and the others as named in the will, were: [Then follows a list of 11 children].
2:182. Sarah Fowler b abt 1700; md Richard Woolsey and settled in Bedford (Rec:58: 265).

Children of RICHARD WOOLSEY and SARAH FOWLER are:


THOMAS WOOLSEY, was born November 1719 in NY - Bedford, Westchester, and died Bet. February 26, 1794 in VA - Washington County (later Smythe County). He married abt 1739 in New York, to (1) ELIZABETH WATERS, daughter of ANTHONY WATERS of Jamaica, Long Island, the mother of all his children, and SARAH PIERCE in NY - Bedford, Westchester, and died February 26, 1794 in VA - Marian, Washington County (later Smythe County).



HANNAH WOOLSEY, b. September 25, 1720, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. November 07, 1829; m. JOSEPH SARLES, 1776, NY - Westchester County.


DANIEL FOWLER WOOLSEY, b. 1721, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. August 1801, NY - Bedford, Westchester; m. MARY DEYO, 1756, Bedford, Westchester, New York.


RUTH WOOLSEY, b. 1723, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. 1783, NY - Fishkill, Dutchess; m. JACOB GRIFFIN, Abt. 1756, NY - Westchester.

Mrs. Garretta P. Hagemeyer.
DAR ID Number: 11638
Born in New York.
Wife of Francis E. Hagemeyer.
Descendant of Lieut. Col. Jacob Griffin and of Maj. Richard Van Wyck, of New York.
Daughter of Rev. David V. M. Johnson and Cathcrine Griffin Van Wyck, his wife.
Granddaughter of Jacob Van Wyck and Cornelia Polhemus, his wife.
Gr.-granddaughter of Theodorus Van Wyck and Hannah Griffin, his wife.
Gr.-gr.-granddaughter of Jacob Griffin and Ruth Woolsey, his wife; Richard Van Wyck and Barbara Van Voorhees, his wife.
Richard Van Wyck 1775, was commissioned major of infantry by the Provincial Congress. He was born at Hempstead, 1727, and died at Fishkill, 1810.
Jacob Griffin, 1775, was lieutenant colonel in the Rombout Precinct and subsequently served under Col. Roswell Hopkins, Dutchess county militia.
_______
Mrs. Elizabeth Clarey Rich.
DAR ID Number: 155454
Born in Richview, Ill.
Wife of Arnold Rich.
Descendant of Lieut. Col. Jacob Griffin, as follows:
1. Maurice Clarey (1858-1900) m. 1895 Margaret Wilgus (b. 1869).
2. Griffin Wilgus (1823-95) m. 1846 Lydia Margaret Talmage (1824-69).
3. Abel Wilgus m. Ann Ackerman (1801-79).
4. Casper Ackerman m. Elizabeth Griffin (1761-1846).
5. Jacob Griffin m. Ruth Woolsey (1736-1825).
Jacob Griffin (1731-1800) was commissioned captain, 1775, and lieutenant colonel, 1778, in the Dutchess County, New York militia. He was born and died in Westchester County, N. Y.



RICHARD WOOLSEY, b. 1725, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. 1811, NY - Bedford, Westchester.


BENJAMIN M WOOLSEY, b. 1728, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. 1795, NY - Marlborough, Ulster; m. MARGAIETE TELLER, December 22, 1761, NY - Rumbout/Poughkeepsie, Dutchess; b. 1731; d. 1811.


RICHARD JR WOOLSEY, b. 1730, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. 1811, NY - Hillsdale, Columbia; m. ANN FULLER, 1760, NY - New Salem.


JOHN WOOLSEY, b. May 24, 1731, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. December 12, 1815, NY - Marlborough, Ulster; m. CHLORINE "CLOE" PECK, January 06, 1757, NY - Salem, Westchester; b. 1731, CT - Stamford, Fairfield; d. July 27, 1816, NY - Marlborough, Ulster.


HENRY C WOOLSEY, b. 1734, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. 1811, NY - Marlborough, Ulster; m. ABIGAIL (WRIGHT) WOOLSEY, 1754, NY - Westchester; b. 1730, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. 1830, OH - Willoughby, Lake.


SARAH WOOLSEY, b. 1736, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. NY - Ulster County; m. EDWIN HAIGHT, 1758, NY - Westchester County.


JOSIAH SR WOOLSEY, b. 1738, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. October 03, 1779, NY - Bedford, Westchester - Sugar House Prison; m. MARY OWEN, 1757, NY - Bedford, Westchester.


MARY WOOLSEY, b. 1740, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. NY - Albany; m. LOTON, 1763, NY - Westchester County.


JOSEPH W WOOLSEY, b. 1742, NY - Bedford, Westchester; d. August 1800, NY - Bedford, Westchester; m. MARY HAIGHT, September 10, 1766, NY - Bedford, Westchester. Joseph is buried in NY - Bedford, Westchester. It is said that Joseph and Mary had eight children but I only have three of those children.


RUTH WOOLSEY, b. 1752, NY - Bedford, Westchester.

 
Richard Woolsey
 
118 The will of Mary Worden, widow of Yarmouth: "That there be no difference amongst my children, my said children also having manifested their willingness and consent on to me to dispose or bequeth what should leift of my worldly goods or estate at my decease as I should see cause as per articles of agreement in writing indented bearing date of the second of May 1681 doeth and may appeare. I ... declare this ... my last will." All wearing apparell to be equally divided between her three daughters Mary Burge, Mercy Winslow, and Martha Severance; the rest of the estate after debts are paid, to son-in-law John Burge; "excepting my Indian squaw servant which will and bequeath to my son Samuell Worden."

Executor John Burge Dated 6 March 1686
Signed by her mark
Proved 31 May 1687
Witnesses: Samuel Sears, Silas Sears, and Gov. Thomas Hinkly.
Recorded 8 June 1687 by Joseph Lathrop, Dep. Reg.

 
Mary Worden
 
119 Peter was a textile merchant and leased from the town of Preston Lancashire, England, a shop and stall in the Moothall being on the ground floor under the Council chamber in the center of Preston.



Life in England: Peter married Margaret Grice, daughter of Thomas and Alice Grice, and widow of Anthony Wall, between February 1603 and March 1604, according to a 1607 Palatine Chancery Court action (PRO-PL6/1, No. 37). She was born between 1566 and 1571, probably in Warrington, Lancashire. She died early in 1612. She had five children by her first husband, who died in 1601.

Peter Worden was listed as "Gentleman" in several documents, and he was a member of the Town Council of Preston, Lancashire, England, which is located about five miles from Clayton. He was a "Foreign (outsider) Burgess" in Preston, and he leased a shop in the Guild hall, located next to the Preston Market Place, on 01 October 1617. The preston Guild Rolls trace his membership in 1582, 1602, and 1622 and that of his father Robert and grandfather William. He was last recorded in Preston on 21 January 1629, when, according to the early archives of Preston Borough, he loaned 8 shillings to the Borough for a project concerned with common lands.

[edit] ?Life in New England In 1630 the Plague, which had already ravaged London, struck Preston, and 1069 people out of a population of 3000 died within the year. Peter Worden, his son, and their families probably left Preston because of the plague, as did many of the other survivors, because he next appears in the American Colonies in the mid 1630s. He was probably one of those who came "On Their Perticulers" (not belonging to any general group of emigrants from England sharing a common sectarian religion--such as the Pilgrims.)

Peter sailed to America with his son Peter Worden in about 1637, although there is no evidence of his journey to America. He may have also come with an illegitimate grandson (John Lewis, mentioned in will. He would have been son of Elizabeth and John Lewis, a married priest who was defrocked and debarred over the affair.). His daughters and wife were dead by 1638.

It is believed that Peter Worden was first in Lynn, Massachusetts before moving to Yarmouth in 1639. In The History of Old Yarmouth, by Charles F. Swift, is the following: "At the extreme easterly part of the Town, Peter Worden [sic] the elder and younger have established themselves, in spite of the opposition of some of their associates, and here the former died the first year of settlement." He is rumored to have been first European land owner in Yarmouth (now East Dennis, Massachusetts). A partial quote from the Dennis-Yarmouth Register published in 1891 states, "Old Werden was doubtless the first Englishman who died and was buried in town. The region of his settlement was in East Dennis. This grave is in the ancient burial place southeast of the Hall, named for him."

Peter Worden's will was probated on 05 March 1639. It is the first will printed in the Plymouth Court Records. A copy of the will remains in the Barnstable Probate Court. In his will Peter Worden left most of his real and personal property in both England and America to his son, Peter Worden. Both he and his son are buried in the Worden Cemetery, overlooking Cape Cod Bay. The cemetery is located on the south side of Route 6A in the Town of Dennis near the border of the Town of Brewster. Diectly across Route 6A, in a pasture, is a small foundation said to be from the house of the elder Peter Worden. The barn in the pasture is said to be built on the original foundation of the house of his son, Peter Worden. Worden Hall, after a varied career, was purchased by an artist, handsomely restored - the name Worden Hall in gold leaf - and is now a home and art gallery. It is interesting to note that no Worden has ever lived there. It was built in 1866 and named in memorial of Peter I, the first European land owner in East Dennis.

The cemetary has in recent years been called the Homer Hall Cemetary instead of the Worden-Winslow Cemetary. The Winslow part of the name coming from Mercy Werden's marriage to Kenelm Winslow. They and many of their descendents are buried there. In 1970, a brass plaque was placed on Peter's grave by the Dennis Cemetary Commission. To quote the Cape Cod Standard Times, "The final resting place was honored with a suitable plaque in simple ceremonies and the ancient cemetary of the Werdens will be preserved as one of the historical spots of Dennis."

[edit] Timeline Birth: cir __ ___ 1576 Clayton, Lancashire. 1582 Preston, Lancashire; appeared as out Burgess in the Guild Rolls. 1602 Preston, Lancashire; also appears as an out burgess in the Guild Rolls. Marriage: cir __ ___ 1603 1609-1613 Preston, Lancashire; served on the town council and his signature appears in White book of orders in 1610 and 1612 and served as juror nine times between 1609 and 1613. Occupation: cir __ ___ 1610 Preston, Lancashire, England; resided in Preston where he worked in some kind of textile business. 1616 Preston, Lancashire; A land transaction portrays Peter as a Gentleman. 01 Oct 1617 Preston, Lancashire; leased a shop in the Moothall (town hall/guild hall) in the market place. 1622 Preston, Lancashire; appears as out Burgess along with son as Peter Wearden. cir __ ___ 1625 Lancashire; Peter was Inspector of cloth (an alnager) for the county. 21 Jan 1630 Preston; On 21 Jul 1630 he was repaid 8 shillings by the town, which he had lent them. 1631 bought a quantity of wine and later sold the wine and some cloth to Hugh Swansey. cir __ ___ 1635 Clayton; Sometime before Peter came to America, William, Peter's brother had mortgaged some of his lands to Peter for a small sum of money. This might have been part of the property in Clayton, which Peter referred to in his will. 1636 Lancashire; In a 1636 court proceeding, he referred to his home, which he inhabited as in Clayton. Note: b 07 Jan 1638/39 came to America, perhaps first to Lynn although no record of this has been found. He may have first learned of the Plymouth Colony from Myles Standish, a relative of the Standish family whom Peter knew in England. 07 Jan 1638/39 Yarmouth, Ma; A General Court of Assistance was held in Plymouth Colony, which listed the names of men to whom grants of land had been made. The list of grantees was followed by a list of four men already there "Psons there excepted against ...Old Worden, Burnell, Wright, Wat Deuille." Will: 09 Feb 1639 Yarmouth, MA; dated 9 Feb 1638 and proved 9 Mar 1639, witnessed by Nicholis Sympkins, Heugh Tillie and Giles Hopkins. Family genealogists have long wondered who the John Lewis provided for in the will was. In 1992 it was discovered that Peter's daughter, Elizabeth, prior to her marriage, gave birth to an illegitimate child, fathered by a married priest by the name of John Lewis. Death: 05 Mar 1638/39 MA; Peter died between February 9, 1638/9 and March 5, 1638/9. It has been thought that he was buried in the Worden Family cemetery in East Dennis but recently this has been questioned. [edit] ?Will Last Will & Testament [1638]

The last will and testament of Peter Werden, of Yarmouth, Ye elder deceased proved at ye General Court held at Plymouth, the 5th day of March, in ye 13th year of ye reign of our sovereign Lord Charles I, King of England, etc., 1638, by ye oathes of Mr. Nicholas Sympkins, Hugh Tillie, & Giles Hopkins - as followeth. Be it know unto all men to whom this doth or may concerne, that I, Peter Werden, of Yarmouth, in New England, in the Plymouth Patten being very sicke, in this yeare of our Lord 1638, and on ye 9th day of February, do make my last will to testify unto all that I, Peter Werden, do give and bequeath unto Peter Werden, my only sonne, and sonne and heir, and in the presence of Nicholas Sympkins, Hugh Tillie, and Giles Hopkins, I do make him my whole executor, to whom I do give all my lands, leases, tenements with goods moveable and unmoveable town of in the town of Clayton in the county of Lankester. Likewise do I give unto Peter, my sonne, all my goods which I have at this present in New England. My will is my sonne is to give to John Lewis one nat goat, also my will is my sonne is to give my grandchild such money as is due for the keeping of goates and calves until this day and that my sonne is with the money to buy John a kid to dispose it otherwise for his use. Also one bed or bolster, 3 blankets, also my sonne is to have the tuition of my grandchild until he be at the age of one and twenty years of age, also my will is he shall fynd him with meate, drink and clothes, and at the three last years of the 21 years also to have 40 shillings the year after and above, for to add to his stock with a sowe pigg when the sowe piggs.

In witness we present set our hand

Nicholas Sympkins Hugh Tilly A His Mark Giles Hopkins G His Mark Witnessess deposed 5th march 1638

This Last Will & Testament was published in the "Mayflower Descendents" Volume 3, 1901, page 75.

?References ? Worden Origins, p. 83.

Roberts, Gary Boyd. Ancestors of American Presidents. (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009).

Ancestor of Rutherford B. Hayes and descendant of William I of Scotland.


March, 1639
Age 70
Burial of Peter
East Dennis, Barnstable County, Massachusetts


Peter worked at Preston Lancashire,England as textil...

Preston Lancashire,England



emigrated on c. 1639


created a will on 3/5/1639

In Barnstable Probate Court in Plymouth Court Records. Left his real and personal property in both England and America to his son, Peter Worden.




 
Peter Worden
 
120 The first official record we have of Peter Worden II is in the Plymouth Court Record, Volume 1, page 156, on the 2nd of June in 1640. It pertains to the granting of a warrant to attach and divide the goods of one Phillip Woodall.

In 1643, Peter II and fifty-one others of Yarmouth are enrolled with those required "to provide a place of defence against sudden assult." Between 1643 and 1658, he was prominent in all public affairs and was repeatedly named as juror. He sold twelve acres in the West Field to Robert Dennis.

In 1651, he was appointed on the Grand Jury and was fined for not serving. He was opposed to the prevailing order of things and in 1667 was fined for creating a disturbance in the meeting house on the Lord's Day, which consisted in speaking his mind audibly about theological matters. The fine being ten shillings to the use of the colony, Plymouth Court Records, Volume 3/4.

In 1675, Gov. Josiah Winslow of Plymouth led the trainbands against the Narragansett Indians and in 1676, King Phillip (Narrangansett Chief) was slain. The war tax of 1676 was very burdensome and Peter's was one of the largest, 8 pounds 2 shilling 3 d.

Peter's Will is dated January 9, 1680 and proved March 3, 1681.

Peter was buried beside his father on his own land. To quote Oliver Newton Worden in 1888, "The graveyard lies on a gentle elevation of the highway, sloping northward, with a fine view of Cape Cod Bay and the town to the north east."

His wife, Mary, survived him by six years. Her will is dated March 6, 1686 and is to be found in the "Mayflower Descendents" Volume 3, Page 201, and the Barnstable County probate records.

 
Peter Worden, II
 
121 Inherited land from his father William about 1574, when he was 40. Not listed in Guild Rolls. Robert is listed in guild Rolls fro 1542 and 1562 with father William. Sons are listed in 1582, but he is not. According to 1574 Manor records, Robert had inherited his father William's lands at age 40, since the previous record written several years before. He was the second son , but his older brother William had died.

The Worden Family in England

The Worden family in the United States cannot go back with certainty beyond Peter I who arrived here in 1623. However, we may assume those listed below are our ancestors. William Werden I of Clayton-le-Woods; Burgess of Preston, 1542 - Had 2 Sons: William Werden II of Clayton-le-Woods; Burgess 1542 Robert Werden of Clayton-le-Woods; Burgess 1542-62 & 1858 - Had 3 Sons: William Werden III of Clayton-le-Woods; Gentleman, Burgess of Preston in 1582-1602-1622 & 1642 James Werden of Clayton; Burgess 1582 & 1602 Peter Werden of Clayton; Burgess 1582 & 1602 - Had a Son: Peter Werden II of Clayton; Burgess 1622 A Burgess was a freeman renting land worth forty shillings anually and entitled to vote and hold office in local government. The law of premogeniture was the law in England and it means that the eldest son always inherits the family property, though the father by Will could leave small farms and leases of other lands to his younger sons. Therefore, William II and William III inherited the family fortune. Robert was the second son and Peter the third. So Peter I was a "yeoman", not a "gentleman" which meant in those days, a man who could live on his income without himself doing any manuel labor. We believe that the name Werden came from the fording place on the brook that forms the boundary between Clayton and Leyland. It is definitely a topographical name. There were two Werden Halls in Leyland, but they are named for the land and no Werden family ever lived in them. In Edward Baines' "History of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster," published in 1831, there is a list of the gentry "who have arms but not residences" and Werden is listed among them. There is an armorial window in the Church of St. Andrew in Leyland. Father Sawle does not know when or by whom it was installed, but suspects it was done by Susan Maria Harington around 1875. Susan Maria Harington does not mention the Werden family in her "History of the Haringtons of Farington and Worden," only the Werden property, but she did know there was a family because she put its Coat of Arms in the top left panel of the window. There is also a Worden Arms included in the long gallery of coats of arms in New Worden Hall.

SOURCE: Unknown: Obtained at Worden Hall in East Dennis, Cape Cod, Mass.

Birth: cir __ ___ 1534 1542 Preston, Lancashire, England; appeared as out-Burgess in guild rolls.

1562 Preston; Robert also appeared as out-Burgess. Marriage: cir __ ___ 1568 contract to marry is in Flowers Visitation 1567. 1574 Clayton, Lancashire, England; Robertus (age 40,son and heir of William) appeared as a tenant-at -will in Roll of Manor Court of Clayton, Lancashire, England (rolls which contained a lists of the tenants of the manor). Note: __ ___ 1574 Isabel's dowery was paid by her brother Richard in 1574. Land which Robert held in Coppull was part of her dower. Death: 11 Sep 1580 Note: aft 11 Sep 1580 Because Robert died when his son and heir was only 11 years old and the lands in Leyland and Clayton were held by feudal tenure, William during his minority was liable to be treated as a ward of his superior lord. Isobel tried hard to avoid this, and was helped by her eldest brother and John Banaster. Court battles were fought between Isobel and Sir Edmund Huddleston as well as between Isobel and her brother Richard along with John Banaster not only for the control but the actual physical person William. We do not know if there was indeed bad feelings between Isobel and her brother and John Banaster or if this was a plan in the legal moves against the Huddlestons. These numerous court battles argue not only over the rights of William the heir but over those of the younger children. Although not conversant with English laws and customs of the times, I wonder if this has anythingto do with Peter I's statements of rights he might have in England.

03 Sep 1584 "Inquisition Post Mortem of Robert Wearden, gent. taken 3 Sep 1584"-Robert Werden, he of the marriage to Isobel Worthinngton, died on 11 September 1580. At his death, he held "1 messuage, 1 cottage, 7 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and ___acres of pasture in Clayton" (these were inquiries into land held at the time of death, by what service he held it and who his heirs were.) He also held land in Coppull and Leyland. Father: William WORDEN (1514-1574)

 
Robert Worden
 
122 Jorund and brother Eirik killed King Guthlaug (Gudlagur) of Halogaland. He also killed King Haki of Sweden. Later he was captured by King Gyllaug of Halogaland and hanged.

He and his brother Eric, the sons of Yngve, became famous by conquering the King Gudlaug of the Haleygians in Norway, whom they had met in Demnark. Met King Hake and his army af the Fyrisvols. In the battle, Eric was killed and Jorund fled to his ship. King Hake was himself so grievously wounded that he ordered a warship to be loaded with his dead men and their weapons, and himself placed on it. The sails were hoisted and the ship set on fire, and out it flew, with the dying king on board. Jorund now became king in Upsala. When he was maurauding in Jutland one summer, he met a son of King Gudlaug in battle and was overpowered, captured and hanged. [WBH - Sweden]

FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES

When Hake had ruled as king of Upsala for three years, Jorund and Eric, the sons of Yngve, returned with warships and warriors. They had grown up and become famous by conquering the king Gudlaug, of the Haleygians in Norway, whom they had met in Denmark. Now they met King Hake and his army at the Fyrisvols. In the battle Eric was killed and Jorund fled to his ship. But King Hake was himself so grievously wounded that he ordered a warship to be loaded with his dead men and their weapons, and himself to be placed upon it. The sails were hoisted and the ship set on fire, and out it flew, with the dying king on board, between the skerries to the sea. Jorund now became king in Upsala. When he was one summer marauding in Jutland, he met a son of King Gudlaug, in the battle with whom he was overpowered, captured and hanged. [History of Sweden, pp. 36-7]

# Reference Number: G6SZ-Q5

---

# Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway

# Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black

# Note: 28. JORUND, YNGVE'S SON.

Jorund, King Yngve's son, remained king at Upsal. He ruled the country; but was often in summer out on war expeditions. One summer he went with his forces to Denmark; and having plundered all around in Jutland, he went into Lymfjord in autumn, and marauded there also. While he was thus lying in Oddesund with his people, King Gylog of Halogaland, a son of King Gudlog, of whom mention is made before, cameup with a great force, and gave battle to Jorund. When the country people saw this they swarmed from all parts towards the battle, in great ships and small; and Jorund was overpowered by the multitude, and his ships cleared of their men. He sprang overboard, but was made prisoner and carried to the land. Gylog ordered a gallows to be erected, led Jorund to it, and had him hanged there. So ended his life. Thjodolf talks of this event thus: --

"Jorund has travelled far and wide,
But the same horse he must bestride
On which he made brave Gudlog ride.
He too must for a necklace wear
Hagbert's fell noose in middle air.
The army leader thus must ride
On Horva's horse, at Lymfjord's side."



 
Jorund Yngvasson
 
123 Drowned in a mead vat after getting drunk at banquet at son's home. He got up in night to relieve himself and opened the wrong door on the balcony and fell in the huge open vat.
Legendary Swedish king, King Fjolnir rose in the night to make water, fell into a vat of mead and drowned instead. [A History of the Vikings, p. 37]

Son of Yngve; drowned by accident in a huge vessel full of mead during a visit paide to King Frode in Denmark; father of Sveigder. [History of Sweden, p. 35]

# Reference Number: G6SX-LB IG

---

# Note: Fjolnir drowned in a mead vat, according to legend. [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev]
# Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
# Note: Page: 3  
Fjolnar Yngvi-Freysson
 

      «Prev 1 2 3